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Czech Republic ∙ Key Topics Discussed at the Workshop on Borderline Products on the EU’s Internal Market journal article

Jan Vavrečka, Nicole Grmelová

European Food and Feed Law Review, Volume 12 (2017), Issue 3, Page 252 - 257

On 7 April 2017 the Department of Business and EU Laws of the University of Economics, Prague (Czech Republic) hosted an expert seminar on borderline products on the EU Internal Market. Members of the scientific committee of the workshop presented 30 separate mini-topics on the delimitation of medicinal products, foodstuffs, cosmetics products, medical devices and biocides. Also, a presentation was held by Professor Bernd van der Meulen of Wageningen University (a member of the editorial board of the European Food and Feed Law Review), who also commented on the individual topics together with Anu Lähteenmäki-Uutela of the University of Turku (Finland). The sharing of a comparative perspective on the functioning of supervisory bodies in the Netherlands and in Finland, respectively, was a particularly enriching experience for the workshop participants originating mainly from the Czech and Slovak Republics. A broad discussion following the initial presentation of the topics included representatives from academia, consumer organizations, state supervisory bodies, industry, consultancies and law firms. The following summary shall address the most essential, the most interesting and the most debated topics of this meeting.


Insects as Food and Feed: Laws of the European Union, United States, Canada, Mexico, Australia, and China journal article

Anu Lähteenmäki-Uutela, Nicole Grmelová, Louise Hénault-Ethier, Marie-Hélène Deschamps, Grant W. Vandenberg, Ai Zhao, Yumei Zhang, Baoru Yang, Vivek Nemane

European Food and Feed Law Review, Volume 12 (2017), Issue 1, Page 22 - 36

Legal rules on the use of insects as feed and food vary across the world. Precise rules on safety, marketing, and animal welfare are largely missing. In the EU, United States and Canada, insects are novel and legally treated as such. In Mexico, Australia, and China, many species of insects have a long tradition of food and/or feed use. We believe recognizing the history of safe use in other countries is fair risk management in insect regulation. Harmonized standards on safety, marketing, and animal welfare would facilitate sustainable growth of the insect business.